Friday, October 08, 2004

Patience game

The candidacy process is a game of patience and perseverance. We've only been sending out information for a few months, but I am already tiring of the sending and waiting, sending and waiting cycle. We have only heard from a few of the churches we sent information to, and most of the responses we've gotten are folks saying, "thanks, but we've already filled the position..." Only two churches have asked for more information about me/us.

I wonder what is the ideal amount of information to send initially. Is it just a resume and cover letter (which is what I've done so far), that plus a Data Form, or something even more. Would I get more responses if I knew the perfect balance of information?

One of the churches that responded was kind enough to say, "please be patient, because we anticipate that it will take us a while to get to the next phase." Why couldn't more churches respect their applicants enough to do this? This is one more facet of the lack of balance in the candidacy process (I'll write more about this later).

I'll be sending out more information over the weekend. More waiting...

2 comments:

travis said...

Right there with ya bro. I hate the waiting game. I am now trying to play my hand strongly with these churches. My prof @ RTS Charlotte, advised us to be agressively confident. That is, I (you, we) are the one searching for a call so we ought to be the ones calling the shots. He says, before you send your info, write, email, call and ask to have an information packet sent to you with Bulletins, budget reports, ministry data form for the church, etc. and then say, "I'll be in touch with you if I think my gifts will complement your body." That way you are the one "in control" and not letting them treat you as the subject under the scope.....whatcha think? Sounds kinda brazen and arrogant, huh? That's why I've never tried it til now....I'll let you know what I hear back.....

Ed said...

Thanks for your comments, Travis. I think it is uncommon for pastoral candidates to be as bold in asking for information upfront; even less common is the urging to do so from someone like a seminary professor. I hope it pays off for you. I fear, however, that the candidate-church will balk at such a bold request...
I will be eager to hear more of the result.